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August 15, 2018

Blackstone’s Mulrow Becomes Cuomo’s Top New York Aide

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo appointed as
his top aide William Mulrow, a senior managing director at
Blackstone Group LP, the world’s largest alternative asset
manager.

The move comes as Cuomo, a 57-year-old Democrat, embarks on
his second term. It was part of a wider staff shuffle that
included the appointment of Cuomo’s budget director, Robert Megna, as the new director of the New York State Thruway
Authority, operator of the largest U.S. toll road.

“New ideas and talent are critical to innovation and
success,” Cuomo said in a statement e-mailed today that
announced the changes. “This team will build on the
extraordinary progress made over the last four years by bringing
experience, energy and fresh perspectives to the table.”

Mulrow, who was Cuomo’s appointee as the chairman of the
New York State Housing Finance Agency, replaces Larry Schwartz,
who is leaving for the private sector. Cuomo’s closest adviser
through his first term, Schwartz has been questioned by the U.S.
Attorney’s Office in Manhattan over the administration’s
meddling with an anti-corruption panel the governor created in
2013 to probe the legislature.

Still, turnover at the beginning of a new term is typical
of any administration, and Mulrow brings with him decades of
political and government work. He was a senior adviser to the
1990 re-election campaign of three-term Governor Mario Cuomo,
Andrew’s father who died Jan. 1, and was director of the United
Nations Development Corporation, among other posts, according to
Cuomo’s statement. He’ll leave Blackstone, where he was a senior
managing director of the investor relations and business
development group.

Tappan Zee

At the Thruway Authority, Megna will replace Tom Madison,
who resigned last month. The agency is building a $4 billion
replacement for the Tappan Zee Bridge across the Hudson River,
among the nation’s largest infrastructure projects.

As part of building the span, the authority’s debt load may
swell to more than $7 billion, from about $3.7 billion in 2013,
by the time the job is finished in 2018. The agency hasn’t
provided a specific plan to pay for it, according to budget
documents.

Last month, the agency approved a $1.7 billion budget with
a deficit of about $25 million and no plan to close it. The gap
is projected to grow to $300 million in 2018, budget documents
show.

To contact the reporter on this story:
Freeman Klopott in Albany at
fklopott@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story:
Stephen Merelman at
smerelman@bloomberg.net
Joshua Gallu, Bernard Kohn

Press spacebar to pause and continue. Press esc to stop.

This article:  

Blackstone’s Mulrow Becomes Cuomo’s Top New York Aide

Crackdown on Protestors: Police Adopt New Plan

For weeks, protestors have declared the streets of Fresno theirs, carrying signs denouncing police brutality while joining their voices with protestors across the country following the deaths of Michael Brown and Eric Garner.

But the most recent protest, on Saturday, caused the biggest disruption to date.

Protestors blocked Blackstone Avenue, near the River Park Shopping Center, chanting, “Killer cops, off our streets!”

“Our officers have been extremely patient with these individuals,” says Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer.

“A protestor will get in the face of the officer, a captain, telling him they hate him all while on video, and our officers are expected to take that.”

Dyer says he supports freedom of speech and the right to protest, but the most recent protest is an example of people breaking the law.

His patience, and the patience of many, is now wearing thin.

“When that spills over into the public right of way, a street or a sidewalk that is blocked, then it requires our enforcement efforts,” he says.

“Citizens have an expectation of us to enforce the laws, equally. And we’re going to do that.”

This week, Chief Dyer and the City Attorney’s Office created a plan of action that, they hope, will keep future protests peaceful — and limit disruptions to the general public.

It starts with reviewing social media posts and police video of previous protests, to identify the organizers.

They will receive warning letters from the City of Fresno.

“What has happened has happened. I’m not going to pursue criminal charges for the past, but in the future, we will,” he says.

“We will be seeking out a warrant for those individuals that are in violation of a misdemeanor obstructing a roadway.”

Those arrested, wouldn’t experience a revolving door at the Fresno County Jail either.

Bench warrants would be signed by a judge, meaning those arrested would be kept in custody.

The police department will also seek restitution for money spent to send officers to control traffic.

In Saturday’s incident, the city spent around $6,000.

“The citizens of Fresno should not have to pay for police officers to be present to block off those roadways and take those police officers away from their neighborhoods,” Dyer says.

He adds that if people really want to protests in the streets, they can go about it the legal way: obtain a parade permit.

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Crackdown on Protestors: Police Adopt New Plan

Massachusetts town jarred by discovery of 3 dead infants in squalid home

Saturday, September 13, 2014 – 3:20pm

A Massachusetts town along the banks of a river was jarred by a gruesome sight this week: three dead infants in a home so squalid, police officers had to search it in hazmat suits.

Little is known about the infants found in Blackstone, including their ages, gender, as well as the causes and manners of their deaths, according to Tim Connolly of the Worcester County District Attorney’s Office.

What’s also unclear is the relationship between them and a woman arrested in connection with their deaths. Law enforcement officials believe Erika Murray may be their mother, according to WBZ in Boston.

Murray, 31, was arraigned Friday on a slew of charges, including concealing an out of wedlock fetal death, two counts of permitting substantial injury to a child, intimidation of a witness, cruelty to an animal and violating an abuse prevention order, according to Connolly.

She has not been charged in the deaths.

Her attorney, Keith Halpern, suggested to WBZ that his client may be mentally ill.

“Who could live in that house who is not seriously mentally ill?” Halpern asked.

The state’s Department of Children and Families removed four children from the home on August 28 after allegations of negligence, spokeswoman Cayenne Isaksen said.

Two weeks after that, on September 11, detectives went to investigate, but they had ” to wear hazmat suits because of the deplorable conditions inside the home, which included massive insect infestation, mounds of used diapers and feces,” according to Connolly.

It was there, amid the filth and squalor, that police discovered the infants’ remains.

“It was a long and very difficult day,” said Joseph Early, the Worcester County District Attorney. “And a sad day.”

The state’s removal of the four living children at the home last month was the result of the filing of what’s called a 51A report in Massachusetts, according to Alec Loftus, a spokesman for the state’s office of Health and Human Services.

A 51A can be filed by any citizen with reason to believe that a child has been abused or neglected. It is not known who filed the report in this case, but Loftus told CNN that “mandatory reporters like police and doctors are required to file when they have cause.”

This was not the first time a 51A had been filed when it came to that home, according to Isaksen. She said such a report was previously received in 2007, but that “it was unsupported and therefore no case was opened.”

For now, Isaksen said DCF has the four children in its care. It is focused on “ensuring (their) safety and well-being and providing them with the proper medical care, support, and services they need,” she said. Connolly said that the family caring for them has no public statement to make at this time.

Murray’s case was adjourned to October 14. Investigators, meanwhile, remain at the scene digging through the squalor.

“Our investigation will continue for quite some time,” Early said.

The-CNN-Wire

Originally posted here: 

Massachusetts town jarred by discovery of 3 dead infants in squalid home